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CP5631 Assignment – Networking Case Study

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CP5631 Assignment – Networking Case study Assignment

Introduction CP5631

This case study has been divided into five components.

You are to design a network, research and source appropriate devices justifying choices (feasibility, efficiency, etc.), subnet the network, assign IP addresses to the appropriate devices, design ACLs to satisfy security requirements, and write a report introduction for the project.

Note: This is not a group project. Each student must individually complete all parts of their submission. 

Students must start with a new document and they must not have another person’s file in their possession at any time. Students may discuss the task with each other, but each student must write their assignment independently and not show their work to other students.

Deliverables

  1. A single Word document (.docx) – containing all parts

Assignment breakdown

CP5631 Internet Fundamentals
CP5631 Internet Fundamentals

Scenario

Ausdata Services Inc., an Australian data analytics company, has asked you to assess and redesign their network. They are opening a new branch in Mackay, which will require new equipment. They have existing contracts and hardware to maintain fibre-optic leased line WAN links between sites.

PART 1 – Introduction

PART 2 – Network diagram

PART 3 – Subnet the network and assign IP addresses to the appropriate devices

PART 4 – Research and source appropriate devices justifying choices (feasibility, efficiency, etc.) with a Weighted Scoring Model (WSM)

PART 5 – Security by applying Access Control Lists (ACLs) to filter traffic

PART 1 – Introduction

The first part of your report should be introduction to the project. Although this is the first part you should include in your report, it should be the last part that you write. In your introduction you are to provide an outline for each of parts 2, 3, and 4.

What to include:

  • Describe the overall task of assessing and redesigning the network.
  • Explain why it is important to produce a well-designed network diagram.
  • Explain why it is necessary to create and document the separate subnets for the network.
  • Explain why new equipment is needed for the new branches, the basic role of the switches and routers, and the process you used to select the equipment.

The introduction should be well-articulated: clear, concise, and use correct spelling and grammar. The intended audience for the introduction can be assumed to have basic technical knowledge but are not networking experts. The introduction should be no longer than a page.

PART 2 – Network specifications and diagram

Network Specifications

You have been given a rough sketch of the network topology below. You are to draw the network using Visio, subnet the network (see part 3), and assign port numbers and IP addresses to ports.


Network Structure

Hardware

  • Only include one switch in you diagram for each LAN or WLAN (even if more are required)
  • Servers should be on their own LAN
  • The Internet router port address is 31.255.14.98/30
  • The Gosford router is connected to the Internet and provides access to the public backbone containing a web server and a compute server.

PART 3 – Subnet the network using VLSM, and assign IP addresses to the appropriate devices.

Each location has the following number of hosts

Gosford, Canberra, Cairns, and Mackay each include a wireless LAN for clients to use.

Location Workstations WLAN addresses
Gosford 750 150
Canberra 600 38
Cairns 250 19
Mackay 90 19
Darwin 60  
Adelaide 50  

Subnetting

Use VLSM to subnet the network topology using a public class B network. You are to use the table format below to provide the subnet details.

Table 1. Subnets (including WAN subnets)

Spreadsheet Columns:  Subnet name, subnet address, subnet mask (in slash format), first useable address, last useable address, broadcast address, static address range and DHCP address range (all addresses to be in dotted decimal notation)

Table 2. Router Interfaces

Spreadsheet Columns:  Location, interface, IP address, subnet mask (in slash format)

Table 3. Servers

Spreadsheet Columns:  Location, server name, IP address, subnet mask (in slash format)

Additional requirements:

  • Choose one private B class network address (/19) for the entire network and subnet this block of addresses to optimise spare addresses for future expansion.
  • Place the WAN subnets in the blocks directly following the LAN address space.
  • Add 100% to each subnet to allow for growth in the number of hosts specified for each LAN (i.e. workstations × 2). Do not allow for any growth in the number of servers or size of WLANs
  • DHCP will to be used for IP address allocation for hosts in each subnet and these ranges are to be allocated for each LAN.
  • Static IP addresses are to be allocated where appropriate.
  • The ISP has given us an IP address of 31.255.14.98/30 for our Internet connection at Gosford.

PART 4 – Research and source appropriate devices justifying choices (feasibility, efficiency, etc.)

You are to research and submit a project procurement plan for the Mackay network. The devices you must include are routers, switches, and wireless access points. Make sure the devices you select can handle the number of workstations required and provide a good quality of service to wired and wireless users.

Your project plan and final recommendations should be based on a Weighted Decision Matrix (like the WDM you did in the Procurement Practical). You are to compare five (5) devices from each category and to base the decision on reasonable and well-justified attributes.

The budget for procurement is $5,500. You may exceed this if you can justify it well.

Your project plan is to contain the following components:

Weighted Decision Matrix – hardware resource requirements analysis

  • Include a written justification for priorities and attributes given in the matrix
  • Create your WDMs in Excel and copy and paste them into your Word doc

Budget

  • Create a well-presented table of the prices of all devices and the total cost
  • Include hardware only, not labour

PART 5 – Access Control Lists

Write ACL tables, in the format taught in the workshops, to address the following security requirements.

Requirements for all ACLs

  • A CLs are to be placed in the optimal position to minimise bandwidth unless the location of the ACL is specified
  • Do not rely on the implicit deny any any
  • No ACL is required on a port where all traffic is permitted
  • Create one ACL table per router

a) Access to the Internet and public backbone

Apply these ACL/s to serial 0/0 on the Gosford router.

1.      External hosts outside the organisation (on the Internet) must only be able to access the Gosford Web server on the public backbone using HTTPS.

2.      No other external access is permitted into the organisation from the Internet.

3.      Internal hosts must only be able to communicate out to the Internet using HTTP and HTTPS (Hint: established connections must be allowed to communicate back into the private network).

b) Gosford and Canberra

4.      The Gosford and Canberra LANs should have unrestricted access to the Internet, and to the Gosford servers.

5.      The Gosford and Canberra WLANs should have HTTP and HTTPS access to the Internet, and to the Gosford Web server, but no access to anywhere else on the corporate network.

6.      The Gosford Web server should have unrestricted communication via HTTP and HTTPS and be able to respond to ping requests from internal hosts.

7.      No traffic from outside the corporate network should be able to reach the Gosford Computer server.

c) The other sites

8.      The other LANs should have HTTP and HTTPS access to the Internet and to the Gosford Web server. The exception is the Mackay LAN, which should have unrestricted Internet access.

9.      The Gosford and Canberra WLANs should have HTTP and HTTPS access to the Internet, and to the Gosford Web server, but no access to anywhere else on the corporate network.

10.  The Adelaide Backup servers should be able to initiate connections via FTP, SFTP anywhere within the corporate network without restriction.

11.  Only traffic from established connections and from the Adelaide LAN is permitted to reach the Adelaide Backup servers. All other access should be blocked.

 Marking Scheme CP5631

Ensure that you follow the processes and guidelines taught in class to produce high quality work. This assessment rubric provides you with the characteristics of exemplary, good, satisfactory, and unacceptable work in relation to task criteria

Criteria Exemplary (90-100)% Good (70-80)% Satisfactory (50-60)% Limited (20-40)% Very Limited (0-10)%
Part 1 Introduction Content   /15   Accurate outline of report contents that demonstrates excellent understanding of networking content.   Suitable for a semi-technical audience.   Accurate outline of report contents that demonstrates good understanding of networking content.   Generally suitable for a semi-technical audience. Generally accurate outline of report contents that demonstrates understanding of networking content.     Provides basic outline of report contents. Incomprehensible, negligible attempt, or not done.
Quality of Writing /5   Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Over half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Under half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) or significant issues in some areas. Many significant errors with structure, grammar, or spelling, or not done.
Part 2 Topology Design Diagram appearance   /10 Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Over half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Under half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) or significant issues in some areas. Many problems (e.g. not done in Visio, inconsistent formatting, diagram does not align to subnetting scheme, etc).
Diagram Labels and Devices   /10 Topology is accurate and the diagram Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Over half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Under half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) or significant issues in some areas. Many problems (e.g. topology is inaccurate; devices are not named, etc).
Part 3 Subnetting Scheme /10 Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but one or two minor issues, such as a missing LAN, or incorrect address block choice. Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but several minor issues (e.g multiple missing LANs or WANs) or a significant issue such as incorrect size. Some LANs and WANs are documented.   Sizes are correct, or at least not outlandishly incorrect. Few LANs and WANs are correctly identified.   Nonsensical subnet size chosen.
Subnet Tables /10 Based on the chosen subnetting scheme, the following specifications are available and correct for LANs and WLANs table, and WANs table:   Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor lapses. Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but several minor issues, or a significant issue such as missing a column. Tables are presented and contain most of the correct columns, and some correct entries. Tables contain major issues such as impossible subnet bounds, or negligible attempt, or not done.
Router Table /10 Based on the chosen subnetting scheme, the following specifications are available and correct in the router interface table:     Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but a few minor issues or missing interfaces. Over half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Table is presented, but contains several significant errors such as mismatched IP addresses or missing columns. Table is generally incomplete or incorrect.
Server Table /5 Based on the chosen subnetting scheme, the following specifications are available and correct in the server table:   Most of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but a few minor issues. Over half of the criteria are satisfactory (See criteria under “exemplary”) but some minor issues. Table is presented, but contains several significant errors such as mismatched IP addresses or missing columns. Table is generally incomplete or incorrect.
Part 4 – Procurement Weighted Decision Matrices /30 As per “exemplary”, but some minor lapses. As per “exemplary”, but several minor lapses, or some significant issues, such missing WDMs, formatting issues, some poor justifications, or some inappropriate hardware choices. Some WDMs are available, but justifications are generally poor, and hardware choices generally inappropriate. Major issues with WDMs, justifications, and hardware choices.
Budget   /10 Professional, detailed, accurate, and visually appealing. As per “exemplary”, but some minor lapses. Generally accurate and visually appealing. Several inaccuracies. Generally inaccurate.
Part 5 – ACLs   /40 ACLs are well presented in tables.   Almost all (10 or 11) requirements are perfectly satisfied. ACLs are well presented in tables, possibly with minor lapses.   Most of the requirements (7 to 9) are perfectly satisfied, or almost all are satisfied with minor lapses. ACLs are presented in tables.   Most of the requirements (6 or more) are satisfied, but there a several issues. ACLs are poorly presented.   Most of the requirements are not correctly satisfied. Negligible attempt or not done.
Overall Document Document and Submission   /5   Submission is a single Word document divided into sections as outlined.     Single Word document, but not correctly divided into sections.   Incorrect submission.
Formatting   /15 Consistent and readable use of fonts.   All tables are consistently neat and easy to read. Consistent and readable use of fonts.   Tables are generally neat and readable. Mostly consistent and readable use of fonts.   Tables are somewhat neat and readable. Inconsistent use of fonts, or inappropriate choice.   Some tables are messy or difficult to read. Poor use of fonts.   Several tables are missing or very poorly formatted.

Sample Solution CP5631 Internet Fundamentals

CP5631 Internet Fundamentals
CP5631 Internet Fundamentals

PART 2 – Subnet the network using VLSM, and assign IP addresses to the appropriate devices.

Table 1. Subnets (including WAN subnets) 104.200.16.26/30

Subnet name Subnet address Subnet mask First usable address Last useable address Broadcast address range Static address range DHCP address range
Sydney_LAN 104.200.16.27 /27 104.200.16.29 104.200.16.254 104.200.16.255 104.200.16.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.16.254
Brisbane_LAN 104.200.24.0 /28 104.200.17.1 104.200.17.254 104.200.17.255 104.200.17.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.17.254
Adelaide_LAN 104.200.28.0 /29 104.200.28.1 104.200.28.254 104.200.28.255 104.200.28.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.28.254
Melbourne_LAN 104.200.32.0 /30 104.200.32.1 104.200.32.254 104.200.32.255 104.200.32.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.32.254
Canberra_LAN 104.200.34.0 /31 104.200.34.1 104.200.34.254 104.200.34.255 104.200.34.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.34.254
Hobart_LAN 104.200.36.0 /32 104.200.36.1 104.200.36.254 104.200.36.255 104.200.36.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.36.254
Brisbane_WLAN 104.200.38.0 /28 104.200.38.1 104.200.38.254 104.200.38.255 104.200.38.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.38.254
Sydney_WLAN 104.200.42.0 /27 104.200.42.1 104.200.42.254 104.200.42.255 104.200.42.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.42.254
Adelaide_WLAN 104.200.44.0 /29 104.200.44.1 104.200.44.254 104.200.44.255 104.200.44.1 104.200.17.1 – 104.200.44.254

Table 2. Router Interfaces

Location Interface IP address Subnet mask
Sydney   S0/0 104.200.44.178 /30
Fa 0/0 104.200.44.167 /28
Brisbane S0/0 104.200.44.179 /30
Fa 0/0 104.200.44.168 /28
Canberra S0/0 104.200.44.180 /30
Fa 0/0 104.200.44.169 /28
Adelaide S0/0 104.200.44.182 /30
Fa 0/0 104.200.44.164 /28
Melbourne S0/0 104.200.44.183 /30
Fa 0/0 104.200.44.163 /28
Hobart S0/0 104.200.44.184 /30
Fa 0/0 104.200.44.161 /28

Table 3. Servers

Location Server name IP address Subnet mask
Sydney Web 104.200.46.10 /29
Database 104.200.46.11 /29
Hobart Backup1 104.200.46.12 /29
Backup2 104.200.46.13 /29
Backup3 104.200.46.14 /29

PART 3 – Research and source appropriate devices justifying choices

Executive summary

  • The devices in the network plan include 6 routers one in each location, 6 switches one in each location, 3 WLAN access point in Sydney Melbourne and Brisbane. However the number of switches for every LAN depends on the port number of the switch and PC numbers of each LAN, 2 servers (web and DB servers) at Sydney and 3 back up servers at Hobart.
  • Among these devices, the most important device is the servers, the web server will handle client requests while the database server will store all the information. Periodic backup servers will ensure continuous operation in case of any unprecedented event.
  • Another key point is that data analysis needs a relatively good computer, especially in the CPU, and Memory
  • At least, the cost should be as low as possible.

Each location has the following number of hosts

Sydney, Melbourne, and Brisbane each include a wireless LAN for clients to use.

Location Workstations WLAN addresses
Sydney 910 14
Melbourne 200 6
Brisbane 40 6
Canberra 120  
Adelaide 70  
Hobart 20  

Weighted Decision Matrix – hardware resource requirements analysis.

The following weights of every requirement are all the same for every device.

0 The requirement does not apply to this scenario
1 The requirement is not very important
2 The requirement is partially met, but not completely
3 The requirement must be met
4 The requirement has been met
5 The requirement is critical
  1. Router

Requirement

Requirement Description Weight
Cost Price is less than 400 1
Speed The transfer speed should be less than 1000m 5
Port number One has at least 4 ports 3
Firewall Security is important 3

Details

Model No of ports Speed (Mbps) Cost $ firewall
Cisco RV042-AU 4 10/100 239 NO
Cisco RV042G-K9-AU 4 1000 285 Yes
Cisco RV324 16 1000 455 Yes
Linksys LRT 214-AU 6 1000 185 Yes
Net Gear FVS336G 2 1000 285 Yes

Weight score

Requirement No of ports Speed (Mbps) Cost & firewall Total weight score
Description >=4 >=1000 <400 Yes  
weight 3 5 1 3  
           
Cisco RV042-AU 4 0 4 0 16
Cisco RV042G-K9-AU 4 4 4 4 48
Cisco RV324 6 4 0 4 50
Linksys LRT 214-AU 6 4 6 4 56
Net Gear FVS336G 0 4 4 4 36
  • Switch

Requirement

Requirement Description Weight
Cost <4000 for all 3
Speed  1000m 3
Port number >=16 5
Manageable Yes 1

Details

Model No of ports Speed (Mbps) Cost & Management Need Number All cost $
Cisco SF 100D-16 16 10/100 79 NO 30 2370
Cisco SF 100-24 24 10/100 109 Yes 21 2289
Cisco SF 200E-24P 24 10/100 489 Yes 21 10269
D-link DGS-1100-24 24 10/100/1000 189 Yes 21 3969
HP J9981A 1820-48G 48 10/100/1000 669 Yes 11 7359

Weight score

Requirement No of ports Speed (Mbps) Cost & Management   Total weight score
Description >=16 >=100 <4000 Yes    
weight 5 3 3 1    
             
Cisco SF 100D-16 4 4 6 0   50
Cisco SF 100-24 4 4 4 4   50
Cisco SF 200E-24P 4 4 0 4   36
D-link DGS-1100-24 4 6 4 4   54
HP J9981A 1820-48G 6 6 2 4   52
  • Wireless access points

Requirement

Requirement Description Weight
Cost <4000 for all 3
Speed  2.5 3
Port number >=16 5
Manageable Yes 1

Details

Model No of ports Speed (Ghs) Cost $ Management Need Number All cost $
TP Link Archer 6 1.34 179 Yes 13 2327
Asus RT-AC530 4 1.3 271 Yes 13 3523
Cisco Aironet 3000 6 2.34 300 Yes 13 3900
Linksys Business Wireless-N600 8 2.5 115 Yes 13 1495
TP-LINK TL-WA901ND 6 1.0 54 Yes 13 1950

Weight score

Requirement No of ports Speed (Ghs) Cost $ Management   Total weight score
Description >=8 <=3 <4000 Yes    
weight 5 3 3 1    
             
TP Link Archer 4 3 6 4   50
Asus RT-AC530 2 4 4 4   50
Cisco Aironet 3000 4 4 0 4   36
Linksys Business Wireless-N600 6 6 4 4   54
TP-LINK TL-WA901ND 4 2 2 4   52

Budget

Item Cost
Cisco Aironet 3000 3900
Cisco SF 200E-24P 10269
Cisco RV324 910
Total 15079
  • Security by applying access control lists to filter traffic

Access to the Internet and public backbone:

   
  External hosts outside the organization must only be able to access the web server on the public using HTTP and HTTPs
  No other external access is permitted into the organization from the internet
  Internal host must only be able to communicate out to the internet using HTTP and HTTPS
  Access-list 100 permit tcp any host 104.200.46.10eq 80
  Access-list permit tcp any host 104.200.46.10eq 443
  Access-list 100 permit tcp any established
  Access-list 101 permit tcp any eq 80
  Access-list 101 permit tcp any eq 443
  Host name: Sydney router

Brisbane, Adelaide, and Canberra

  This LANs are to have unrestricted access to the Sydney server
  This LANs are to have unrestricted access to each other except that all three LANs are to be restricted from initiating ping requests
  Each of them are not allowed to access anywhere else on the network
  ACL
  Access-list 100 permit IP any host 104.200.46.10
  Access-list 100 permit IP any host 104.200.46.10
  access-list 100 permit TCP host 104.20.0.2 host 104.200.38.138 eq 1433 (Assume that the ip address of Seattle server is 150.10.0.2)
   

Hobart

  Access-list 100 permit ip host 104.200.46.10
  access-list 100 permit icmp any 104.200.45.1 0.0.15.255 echo-reply
  access-list 100 permit icmp any 104.200.45.1 0.0.15.255 echo-reply
  access-list 100 permit tcp any host 104.200.45.139 eq 22
  access-list 100 permit tcp any host 104.200.45.139 eq 22
  access-list 100 deny ip 104.200.45 any

 

PART 5 – Cloud computing proposal

Replacing ALL workstations within the organisation with thin clients, which will access a desktop environment provided by a cloud service provider (such as Amazon)

Item Description Quantity Cost per Year
workstations Maintenance 1360 $ 1,088,000
Workstations Electricity 1360 272,000 KwH

Replacing ALL workstations within the organization with thin clients, which will access a desktop environment provided by a private cloud infrastructure, created in-house and based in Sydney.

Item Description Quantity Cost per Year
workstations Maintenance 1360 $ 1,088,000
Workstations Electricity 1360 272,000 KwH

Introduction

Typically, cloud technology frameworks are designed with redundant components and locations to assure a single failure does not interrupt service. The multi-tenant design of cloud computing services brings economy of mechanism and ultimately a lower total cost of ownership to provider and customer. Clearly, cloud computing has opened many doors for organizations to grow revenue, reach new markets, improve productivity, and expand product offering. These same doorways open to a large untrusted network when cloud services are connected to the Internet. “The chief concern firms have with the cloud is the overall security of their data.

Business Considerations

According to Skyhigh Networks, “The cloud has created a new wave of enterprise software that is not only faster to develop, easier to deploy, and more cost effective, but also offers innovative features not found elsewhere. That’s because much of the innovation today is happening in software delivered via the cloud, and for many customers, the cloud is mainstream” An interesting finding was that companies are selecting cloud based solutions because their evaluation has identified the cloud application as the best-in-class enterprise application not just best-in-class cloud-based application.

Cost

Lower power costs. Cloud computing uses less electricity. That’s an inevitable result of the economies of scale. Better hardware utilization means more efficient power use.

Lower people costs. Whenever I analyze organizations’ computing costs, the staffing budget is usually the biggest single line item; it often makes up more than half of the total. Good IT people are expensive; their salaries, benefits, and other employment costs usually outweigh the costs of hardware and software. And that’s even before you add in the cost of recruiting good staff with the right experience.

Security

Despite the potential gains achieved from the cloud computing, the organizations are slow in accepting it due to security issues and challenges associated with it. Security is one of the major issues which hamper the growth of cloud. The idea of handing over important data to another company is worrisome, such that the consumers need to be vigilant in understanding the risks of data breaches in this new environment. The company will adopt standard security measures to maintain integrity security of data.

Conclusion

Prospect and existing customers of service providers are demanding confidentiality, integrity, and availability when contracting with vendors for cloud computing. Contracts and service level obligations that commit to only availability objectives are not adequate to manage business risk. Service Level Agreements provide a vehicle of communication between the vendor and customer regarding performance and quality expectations. It is best for the company to adopt cloud computing as explained above.

References

Millard, Christopher (2013). Cloud Computing Law. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-967168-7.

Singh, Jatinder; Powles, Julia; Pasquier, Thomas; Bacon, Jean (July 2015). “Data Flow Management and Compliance in Cloud Computing”. IEEE Cloud Computing. 2 (4): 24–32. doi:10.1109/MCC.2015.69.

Armbrust, Michael; Stoica, Ion; Zaharia, Matei; Fox, Armando; Griffith, Rean; Joseph, Anthony D.; Katz, Randy; Konwinski, Andy; Lee, Gunho; Patterson, David; Rabkin, Ariel (1 April 2010). “A view of cloud computing”. Communications of the ACM. 53 (4): 50. doi:10.1145/1721654.1721672.

Hu, Tung-Hui (2015). A Prehistory of the Cloud. MIT Press. ISBN 978-0-262-02951-3.

Mell, P. (2011, September 31). The NIST Definition of Cloud Computing. Retrieved November 1, 2015, from National Institute of Standards and Technology website: http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-145/SP800-145.pdf

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