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Faculty of Health and Well being

BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care Studies

Health and Social Care Values SC1001

Student Handbook

Semester 1

This handbook is for general guidance only.  Content is subject to change.

Module Leader: Dr Craig Johnston

Contacts:

  BA (Hons) Health, Community and Social Care Studies@ University of Winchester
RoleNameRoomPhone  E-mail
Head of DepartmentHazel BrownAlwyn West 97329Hazel.brown@winchester.ac.uk
Programme LeaderDavid RaperAlwyn West 0047035david.raper@winchester.ac.uk  
Module LeaderCraig JohnstonAlwyn West 0037035craig,johnston@winchester.ac.uk  
Programme AdministratorTBCTBC7558 Community&HealthAdmin@winchester.ac.uk,
  Faculty of Education Contacts  
RoleNameRoomPhone  E-mail
Learning TechnologistPam MaundersFWB 1027551Pam.maunders@winchester.ac.uk
Resource Base OfficerCatherine WhartonHJB 127094Catherine.Wharton@winchester.ac.uk

Module Rationale

This first-year module provides students with an insight into how societies and individuals value and de-value others, in particular, those people who use social care services. We will examine the ways in which values, attitudes and beliefs affect all aspects of our everyday lives and how these can lead us to discriminate against others and be discriminated against ourselves. Issues around equality, diversity and identity will be identified. This module aims to equip students with an introductory insight into the themes running throughout their degree course and throughout society in general.

Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

Module learning activities

Lectures19  
Seminar  5
Tutorial  12
Student managed learning114  
Total150  

Learning Outcomes

By the conclusion of this module, a student will be expected to be able to :

A – Demonstrate,utilising appropriate and accurate academic writing, an understanding of the effect of health and social care models, legislation and agendas on people who use services.

B – Introduce, utilising appropriate and accurate academic writing, concepts and theories that underpin understandings of values in health and social care practice.

C- Introduce and reflect upon, utilising appropriate and accurate academic writing

 societal and personal values, attitudes and beliefs relevant to health and social care.

Programme Content: Health and Social Care Values

After each session you need to consider how the session has contributed to your good practice guide, and also keep a diary that reflects on what the learning has been for you from the session (e.g. triggers, new ideas, and challenges)

Directed Tasks

Directed tasks may be used:

  • to prepare students for a taught session, such as prior reading or preparation for an activity;
  • to follow-up and extend learning from a session, such as further reading;
  • the consider research material for discussion in a seminar;
  • to prepare presentations for seminars;
  • to research local and national facilities; and
  • to prepare for an assignment, such as gathering information.
  •  

All directed tasks must be completed. University-based tasks are checked informally by University tutors for example by:

  • discussion in session
  • collection to make informal assessment of understanding
  • sharing with fellow students to discuss issues arising from task
  • contributions made to the taught session

Directed tasks are assessed only when they form part of the University formal assessment through contribution to an assignment

David.Raper

Hi all I think these words should work for the first year handbooks – can you insert/edit into the appropriate places (For all Level 5 and 6 handbooks stick to the style we’ve been using previously) – let me know if you think anything should be added/changed.

Wed 07/08

Formal Assessment

The tutor will introduce the assignment and guide you in your study but you should read the assignment brief very carefully and ensure that you address what is required. The essay can be based on a particular service user group of your choice. (Please see Guidance Notes- Marking Criteria).

Summative Assessment

Devise a good practice guide of 3000 words for new members of staff in a health and/or social care setting.  The taught sessions will assist you in preparing the structure and content of your guide.  The following ‘prompts’ may help you to structure your ideas and give a framework for addressing the essay question.

Your ‘good practice guide’ will act as an induction resource for new workers who may be joining your organisation (which could be an organisation you have some experience in through work placement or volunteering).  This may include organisations that are in the statutory, voluntary or private sectors.

The Good Practice Guide should include the following elements (2000 words):

  • Title page
  • Contents page
  • Introduction
  • A mission statement
  • An equalities and diversity statement
  • Values in practice (discussion)
    • Person centred practice
    • Ethics
    • Empowerment
    • Participation
    • Normalisation
  • Professional practice
    • Service user involvement
    • Supporting personalisation
    • Relevant codes of practice/conduct
    • Managing data and information sharing
  • Reflective Statement (1000 words maximum)
  • Appendices (if you use them)
  • References

Assignment Submission

There is one assessment for this module which will make up 100% of the mark. 3000 words

Feedback

For this module drafts may be submitted for general feedback until Week 10.

Hand in Dates

Late Work & Second AttemptsSubmission dateReturn date  
Work first submitted after 3.30pm on Tuesday January 4th but within one week (without an agreed extension date for extenuating circumstances) will be marked as LATE and will normally be marked for a maximum of 40% with the opportunity to resubmit a second attempt if required. If you are unsure of a deadline, then please be sure to seek clarification from the Module Leader. Claiming that you did not know, or forgot the deadline will not be accepted.January 4th 3.30pmJan 25th
Work first submitted over one week late (without an agreed extension date for extenuating circumstances) will be treated as a FAIL at first attempt and treated as a SECOND ATTEMPT and marked at a maximum of 40% with no opportunity for a further second attempt. There will be no further attempts allowed.January 11th 3.30pm 
Second Attempt Deadline: In the event that you need to submit a second attempt of your assignment, after failing to achieve a pass mark of 40% at the first attempt.February 15th at 3.30pmThree Weeks

Second attempts

Assignments are submitted electronically through Turnitin to allow the Programme to check work with a ‘similarity index tool’.  This allows us to see where submitted work is very similar to work in the literature (e.g. where sentences or paragraphs are ‘copied and pasted’).  Where there are high levels of similarity between student’s work and the literature (25% and over) we will advise students to seek support on study skills in the first year.  As the degree progresses high similarity scores will result in increasing penalties, including actions related to ‘poor academic practice or ‘plagiarism’. (Please see Programme Handbook for further information). It is your responsibility to access your feedback and mark, to contact your module leader regarding resubmission and to resubmit in accordance with these deadlines

It is your responsibility to access your feedback and mark, to contact your module leader regarding resubmission and to resubmit in accordance with these deadlines. Assignments are submitted electronically through Canvas (and linked to ‘Turnitin’) to allow the Programme to check work with a ‘similarity index tool’.  This allows us to see where submitted work is very similar to work in the literature (e.g. where sentences or paragraphs are ‘copied and pasted’).  Where there are high levels of similarity between students work and the literature (25% and over) we will advise students to seek support on study skills in the first year.  As the degree progresses high similarity scores will result in increasing penalties, including actions related to ‘poor academic practice, ‘plagiarism’ or self-plagiarism. (Please see Programme Handbook or the University of Winchester’s Academic Misconduct policy guideline for further information). www.winchester.ac.uk/…/Publicdocuments/…/Academic%20Misconduct%20Policy.pdf

We retain copies of assessed work for the External Examiner to review, and for future students to look at to help them understand the assessment process. (NB: We always anonymise assessed work, which is being used as examples for future students and will ask for your permission to use it).

If you are concerned about your work, please consult with either the Module Leader or your Personal Tutor before submitting the assignment by the specified deadline date and time. If you do not understand the policy on plagiarism, please consult with an academic member of staff. If you are unsure of a deadline, then please be sure to seek clarification from the Module Leader. Claiming that you did not know, or forgot, the deadline will not be accepted.

All assignments should be word-processed in calibri font, size 11, black type, 1.5 line spaced, with 2.5 cm margins, page numbered throughout, should include a reference list, and should be presented as outlined in the programme handbook. In the header of each page you must have your name, student number and the title of the module. Please consult the Faculty’s Assignment Guidelines on the Learning Network.

Word Limits

Writing succinctly is a key academic skill which the programme seeks to promote. The student must note the word limit on the assignment.  You should include the word count for your assignment at the end of the work.  The word limit includes the following:

•         Every word from the introduction to the conclusion, including headings

•         Quotations included in the body of the text

•         In-line references

The word limit excludes the following:

•         Title page

•         List of references

•         Appendices

•         Diagrams, graphs, images etc.

The following infringements will incur a marking penalty:

•            An excess or deficiency of 10% or more of the word limit (ie +/- 10%);

Penalties

•            Any excess over the allowed 10% is penalised.  Work beyond the word limit will not be marked (although it will receive feedback);

•            Work below the word limit is highly likely to lack sufficient detail to meet the learning outcomes and will be marked accordingly.

Assessment Regulations (2015-16:24-25)

http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Freedomofinformation/Publicdocuments/Documents/Assessment%20Regulations%202015-16.pdf

“Your scheduled average weekly contact time for this module comprises pre-recorded content, face-to-face classroom time and live-streamed delivery.”

Summative Assignment

  Success Criteria    Further Details (what the success criteria mean)  
StyleClearly written, with correct spelling and grammar; Avoidance of repetition and unnecessary material (i.e. no ‘waffle’ or ‘padding’); Arguments are presented clearly and the work is ‘focused’ on the assignment title. A footer across each page should contain: name, student number, module title and code, and key words from assignment title.  
StructureCan be presented in a report style (e.g. you can use heading, subheadings, bullet points etc.)  
Application of theory to practiceClear attempts to define key concepts and terms; Appropriate, limited use is made of direct quotations; Frequent use is made of supporting literature  
Use of SourcesIn depth, accurate understanding of credible academic sources is demonstrated (no newspapers or news websites unless applicable)  
ReferencingReferencing in the text should conform to Harvard protocol, e.g. author (year, page no) A full Bibliography

Guidance Notes – Marking criteria

Please refer to the PRESENTATION OF WRITTEN COURSEWORK in your programme handbook. In addition to this the markers will be looking for evidence of the module learning outcomes: In particular you need to make sure that in your essay you show that you understand how policy is made, along with an awareness of political ideology, and how this affects decisions made about health and social care policy.  You will need to make reference to ‘mixed economies of welfare’, and to what extent the current move to delivering health and social care services within communities rather than in institutions is effective.

They will also be considering specific criteria relevant to the particular assessment.

GRADE DESCRIPTORS

The grading descriptors that follow offer representations of achievement by marks from 100 to 0. The pass mark for modules which accrue credit is 40%. Programmes and fields may enhance these criteria to meet the specific requirements of the subject.

Grade Descriptors for Students’ Assessed Work (Levels 4-6)

To ensure consistency and quality assurance, students’ written work will be marked against the criteria below. In addition, assessment for each module will be outlined in the module handbook with a set of criteria specific to the particular assignment. The grading descriptors that follow offer representations of achievement by marks from 100 to 0.

In taught modules, the minimum mark that a student must achieve in each element of assessment in order to pass is 40%.

Grade A* 80-100%

Work at this level which (where appropriate) demonstrates exceptional:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

(Staff and students should note that the A* grade may be used on coversheets and assignments as part of the feedback process. A mark of 80% and above will not be distinguished from a mark of between 70- 79% on the University’s student records system and will show as an A grade only)

Grade A 70-79%

Work at this level which (where appropriate) demonstrates excellent:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

Grade B 60-69%

Work at this level which (where appropriate) demonstrates very good:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

Grade C 50-59%

Work at this level which (where appropriate) demonstrates good:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

Grade D 40-49%

 Work at this level which (where appropriate) demonstrates satisfactory:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

Fail Grades   Below 40%

Students awarded a mark below 40% at the first attempt shall normally be permitted a second attempt to achieve a capped mark of 40%, a grade D.

GRADE F 30-39%

This mark indicates the work has been submitted but was failed on grounds of one of the following: (where appropriate) demonstrates unsatisfactory:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

Grade F 1-29%

This mark indicates the work has been submitted but was failed on grounds of one of the following: (where appropriate) demonstrates poor:

Research and Enquiry skills including an ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources

Academic Skills including academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to

brief, according to subject requirements, communication and presentation

Subject Knowledge and Understanding including Intellectual engagement, grasp of

concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations

Applied and Practical Skills including Technical/professional/performative/field or lab based/digital etc. May include discipline specific skills such as creative writing

Values, Qualities and Attributes including Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection

A mark of 1% at any level indicates:

a) potential poor academic practice;

b) suspected academic misconduct;

c) second attempt submitted after the deadline;

d) corrupt, unreadable files or incorrect format submitted for eSubmission;

e) complete failure to meet the assessment brief.

Grade F 0%

Work not submitted.

Academic Regulations for Taught Programmes

https://www.winchester.ac.uk/about-us/leadership-and-governance/policies-and-procedures/

Where Turnitin reports suggest poor academic practice, misconduct or plagiarism of any kind, anonymity MAY need to be waived.

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES OF STUDY

http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Freedomofinformation/Publicdocuments/Pages/Public-Documents.aspx?category=Academic%20Regulations,%20policies%20and%20procedures

ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT POLICY

the Academic Misconduct Policy which gives you information about how the University defines and acts regarding plagiarism, self-plagiarism and cheating in exams for example, can be found at

http://www.winchester.ac.uk/Freedomofinformation/Publicdocuments/PublicDocuments/Academic%20Misconduct%20Policy.pdf

Please do make yourself familiar with these policies and ask if you are unsure as we are all happy to help.

Mapped Learning Outcomes

Learning OutcomesAssessment CriteriaSpecific Focus
Demonstrate,utilising appropriate and accurate academic writing, an understanding of the effect of health and social care models, legislation and agendas on people who use servicesSubject Knowledge and Understanding  Intellectual engagement, grasp of concepts, principles, key tenets of subject, theory, context, limitations
Introduce, utilising appropriate and accurate academic writing, concepts and theories that underpin understandings of values in health and social care practiceValues, Qualities and Attributes  Ethical, legal, moral, subject-related and professional values, hard and soft skills; desired characteristics, behaviours and attributes e.g. self-criticality and reflection
Introduce and reflect upon, utilising appropriate and accurate academic writing, societal and personal values, attitudes and beliefs relevant to health and social care.  Research and Enquiry           Academic Skills  Ability to identify relevant sources, evaluate, use materials and compare data in a range of forms and from diverse sources   Academic conventions, structures, referencing, ability to respond to brief

ACADEMIC REGULATIONS FOR UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMMES OF STUDY  

https://intranet.winchester.ac.uk/information-bank/quality-office/Documents/Forms/all.aspx?View={C2FC2804-174B-435B-9712-D512580DCD32}&FilterField1=TaxKeyword&FilterValue1=Regulations%20and%20Policies

Key Texts:

Allott, M. and Robb, M. (Eds) (1998) Understanding Health and Social Care London: Sage

Banks,S. (2006) Ethics and Values in Social Work (3rd Ed): Palgrave MacMillan

Beckett,C. and Maynard,A. (2005)  Values and Ethics in Social Work: An Introduction:  Sage

Bogg,D. (2010) Values and Ethics in Mental Health Practice: Learning Matters

Bytheway, B., Bacigalupo, V., Bornat, J., Johnson, J. and Spurr, S. (Eds) (2002) Understanding care, welfare and community a reader London: Routledge

Clements, P and Spinks, T. (2006), The Equal Opportunities Handbook (4th ed):Kogan Page  (e book)

McCarthy,J and Rose,P (Ed) (2010)  Values-Based Health and Social Care. Beyond Evidence-Based practice: Sage

Payne, M. (2009) Social Care Practice in Context (Reshaping Social Work) Palgrave Macmillan

Thompson,N. (2006)  , Anti-discriminatory Practice (3rd Ed):  BASW Practical Social Work Palgrave

Thompson, N and Thompson,S. (2007) Understanding Social Care (2nd Ed): Russell House

Further Texts:

Bogg,D. (2010) Values and Ethics in Mental Health Practice. Exeter: Learning Matters

Gain,C. (2010) Equality and Diversity in Social Work Practice. Exeter: Learning Matters

Glasby,J. (2007) Understanding Health and Social Care. Bristol: Policy Press

Goffman, E. (1961) Asylums Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and other Inmates London: Penguin

Heller, T., Muston, R., Sidell, M. and Lloyd, C. (Eds) (2001) Working for Health, London: Sage

Jackson, L., McIntosh, B. and Whittaker, A. (Eds) (2000) Unlocking the Future: Developing New Lifestyles with People Who Have Complex Need, London: Kings Fund

McCarthy,J. & Rose,P. (eds.) (2010) Value Based Health and Social Care: Beyond Evidence Based Practice. London: Sage (Paperback and E Book)

Naidoo, J. Wills, J. (2008) Health Studies: An Introduction, (2nd Ed). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan

Oliver, M. (2009), Understand Disability: From Theory to Practice (2nd Ed):Oxford Palgrave Macmillan

Parrott, L. (2010) Values and Ethics in Social Work Practice. Exeter: Learning Matters

Russell, M. (1998) Beyond Ramps: Disability at the end of the Social Contract: A Warning from an Uppity Crip, Monroe, Me, USA: Common Courage Press

Singer, P. (Ed) (1991) A Companion to Ethics Oxford: Blackwell

Swain, J. et al (2004), Disabling Barriers: Enabling Environments (2nd Ed) London: Sage

  Thompson,N. (2006) Anti-Discriminatory Practice. Palgrave Macmillan   Thompson,N. & Thompson,S. (2007) Understanding Social Care. London: RHP   Tregaskis, C. (2004) Constructions of Disability: Researching the Interface Between Disabled and Non-Disabled People London: Routledge

Policy Guidelines relevant to the module:

Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008) The Code: Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics for Nurses and Midwives

http://www.nmc-uk.org/Nurses-and-midwives/Standards-and-guidance1/The-code/The-code-in-full/

Department of Health (2013) The Education Outcomes Framework. London: The Stationery Office.

RAND Europe, Ernst & Young LLP (2013) National Evaluation of the Department of Health’s Integrated Care Pilots. London: Department of Health

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-evaluation-of-department-of-healths-integrated-care-pilots

Department of Health (2012) NHS and Social Care Act 2012. London. Stationary Office

Department of Health (undated) National Data Sets. http://www.ic.nhs.uk/datasets [accessed 01/09/13]

Websites:

https://www.gov.uk/search?tab=government-results&q=Department+of+Health
  • Department of Health: Right Care, Right Place, Right Time: How Can We Improve Health and Care for Venerable Older People?

      http://betterhealthandcare.readandcomment.com/

http://www.hscic.gov.uk/

https://www.gov.uk/search?q=public+health+england&tab=government-results

Harvard Referencing

For assistance with the Harvard System of citation please see the Faculty of Education, Health and Social Care Guidelines for Written Assignments

SC1001 Health and Social Care Values ASSESSMENT FEEDBACK
Student name:                 Assignment topic: Essay             Marking tutor: HCSCS TeamMarking criteria70+ Comprehensive knowledge Awareness of controversies Sustain analytical argument Constructive, original line of thought High standard of literacy Correct referencing60-69% Good knowledge Competence in analysis Appropriate connections Detailed treatment of material Good standard of literacy and referencing50-59% Sound knowledge Soundness of argument Descriptive approach Competent coverage of topic Sound standard of literacy and referencing40-49% Superficial knowledge Factual and descriptive Limited coverage of topic Some errors in literacy and referencingBelow 40% Does not answer the question; significant omissions, or inclusion of incorrect or irrelevant material; Meaning impaired by literacy and unsatisfactory referencing
Demonstrate an understanding of the effect of health and social care legislation and agendas on people who use service     
Introduce concepts and theories that underpin understandings of values in health and social care practice     
Demonstrate understanding of current good practice models in health and social care work     
Introduce societal and personal values, attitudes and beliefs relevant to health and social care     
Develop skills in reflective practice and understanding of own values     
Comments:        
Mark awarded:  
Marker signed:   Date:Moderator signed:   Date: